Lexical Girl


With Great Verbosity Comes Great Responsibility



Books. Publishing. Words.
Install Theme
theashleyclements:

Stopped by The Last Bookstore today

theashleyclements:

Stopped by The Last Bookstore today

thingsfittingperfectlyintothings:

willumblr:

Must be something about Harry Potter books and fitting into things

more harry potter books + bookshelf

thingsfittingperfectlyintothings:

willumblr:

Must be something about Harry Potter books and fitting into things

more harry potter books + bookshelf

simonschusterca:

Beloved Books With Shockingly Bad Reviews [x]

gothiccharmschool:

The birth of a book. I find it mesmerizing.

(Source: emissarydeatons, via project-read)

thingsfittingperfectlyintothings:

full harry potter book series + bookshelves

(fits found by stevetoons and bittersparkx)

(via heart-deco)

(Source: medleypond, via project-read)

quadlutz:

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay
“He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”
"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”
"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”
"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”
"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course: "The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

i’ll never forget the exchange “it’s unpleasantly like being drunk.” “what’s so unpleasant about being drunk?” “you ask a glass of water.”

quadlutz:

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay

He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”

"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”

"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”

"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”

"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course:

"The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

i’ll never forget the exchange “it’s unpleasantly like being drunk.” “what’s so unpleasant about being drunk?” “you ask a glass of water.”

(Source: pizzahottie, via bestbromancecompany)

milkywayrollercoaster:

LX Factory Bookshop - Lisbon

(via project-read)

fairytalemood:

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi, a reimagining of “Snow White”

From the prizewinning author of Mr. Fox, the Snow White fairy tale brilliantly recast as a story of family secrets, race, beauty, and vanity.

In the winter of 1953, Boy Novak arrives by chance in a small town in Massachusetts, looking, she believes, for beauty—the opposite of the life she’s left behind in New York. She marries a local widower and becomes stepmother to his winsome daughter, Snow Whitman.

A wicked stepmother is a creature Boy never imagined she’d become, but elements of the familiar tale of aesthetic obsession begin to play themselves out when the birth of Boy’s daughter, Bird, who is dark-skinned, exposes the Whitmans as light-skinned African Americans passing for white. Among them, Boy, Snow, and Bird confront the tyranny of the mirror to ask how much power surfaces really hold.

Dazzlingly inventive and powerfully moving, Boy, Snow, Bird is an astonishing and enchanting novel. With breathtaking feats of imagination, Helen Oyeyemi confirms her place as one of the most original and dynamic literary voices of our time.

This is the best book I’ve read this year. Go read it!

(via cleolinda)

zagreussits:

betterbooktitles:

Another important message from @DanWilbur 

That blind old man better be using Mykeneaen Greek because I want the ORIGINAL story, not that Homeric adaptation.

zagreussits:

betterbooktitles:

Another important message from @DanWilbur

That blind old man better be using Mykeneaen Greek because I want the ORIGINAL story, not that Homeric adaptation.